Thursday, April 3, 2014

Switching from indoor to outdoor tennis

Dallas Aleman | Towpath Tennis Owner | Tennis Guru
Niya Fried at the JTT Championships in Indianapolis, IN.
 This is the time of year when you'll get the chance to play outside and practice. However, the first time out will be a shock to your game because conditions are so different. You'll feel like you've never hit a ball with any power and it'll feel like an eternity for the ball to travel over the net. That is the beauty of tennis, you have to be able to play through many types of elements; indoors and out, day and night, sun and wind. Those that are adaptable usually play well. Those that can’t adjust fall by the wayside.
Your first time out is going to be a setback. You will probably have a bad day, and so what! You can use a bad day as a springboard for a good day tomorrow. Depending on what the main culprit was that affected you game, follow the tips below to start your outdoor transition on the right swing. 

Sun - Bring a visor/hat/sunglasses. While serving, use your hand to block the shine as you toss the ball or toss the ball where the sun isn't as bright.

Wind - If coming behind you, use more top spin (low to high swing) to prevent a total blowout shot. If facing the wind, step into the shot with a more aggressive swing. However, if the wind is blowing lateral, adjust the direction of your shot by guiding it into the wind. 

Night - Whether it's getting dark or you're playing under the lights, the ball is going to play tricks on your eyes. Sometimes instead of one ball, it looks like 5 are coming at you at once! Keep your eye on the ball when it hits the ground and recite "bounce_hit" to find a rhythm. So when you see 'multiple' balls coming at you, you'll know which one to swing at. 

Noise - You might have already adjusted to the sounds of drills and lessons going on the next court over, but have you played with kids screaming, sirens blaring and a dog let loose beside you? Tuning out the sights and sounds of outdoor playing is a tall order but it can be done! Try humming to yourself and paying particular attention to the ball to keep your mind focused in the point. In between points, look at your strings or the ground to keep your eye from wandering.  

Rain - Depending on the surface, you might be able to play through a light shower because surfaces like har-tru and clay absorb the rain slower making them less slippery. However, whenever heavy rain (or fog) is in the forecast, it's best to avoid playing altogether. Not only will the courts be slick, but there's the danger of lightening as well. 

Remember, your first day out might be an ugly one, but follow these tips and you'll find yourself adjusting to Mother Nature before your opponents know what's what!

For those interested in getting a lesson from staff pro Alvin to prepare for the upcoming high school and/or match season, text TENNIS4 to #81680 and you will get this mobile coupon:
"Show the text and get $20 off a lesson with Alvin when you book a lesson with him on Fri, Sat, Sunday, or Monday during the month of April."

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1 comment:

  1. Well, there is a little difference in playing indoor and outdoor tennis. Most probably, we have found difference in between courts and audience. Apart from all a player feel some psychological pressure in both circumstances. Here from this article also we learn some important facts about outdoor and indoor tennis. Thanks for highlighting such important issues.
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